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20130201
20130228
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
-maliki. in tunisia, huge crowds of mourners protested as opposition leader chokri belaid was laid to rest. he was assassinated earlier this week. tens of thousands converged on the cemetery, with belaid's coffin draped in a tunisian flag. violence erupted as police fired tear gas and demonstrators threw stones and set cars ablaze. thousands of demonstrators turned out in cairo and other cities across egypt, protesting president mohammed morsi and his islamist-led government. the crowds defied hard-line muslim clerics, who called on their supporters to kill opposition leaders. as night fell, security forces used tear gas to disperse protesters who threw rocks and fire bombs at the presidential palace. gunmen in nigeria have killed at least nine women working to immunize children against the polio virus. the attacks today were in kano, in the african nation's muslim north. the killers were believed to come from boko haram, a radical islamic sect. polio remains endemic in nigeria, but some muslim clerics have charged the vaccinations are a plot to sterilize young girls. the british government to
america to khartoum, from tunisia to yemen, from egypt to mali and others. while dod does not have the primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i've said, we had received from the intelligence community almost 300 reports on possible threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11th general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities, including those in cairo, egypt, but there were no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42pm eastern daylight time on september 11th. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 17 minutes of the initial reports, about 3:59pm, africom directed an unarmed and unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to reposition overhead the bengh
diplomatic staff in advance of a crisis, from central america to khartoum, from tunisia to yemen, from egypt and mali to and eyes. while dod does not have the primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i said, we had received from the intelligence community, almost 300 reports on upon threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11th, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities. including those in cairo, egypt. but there are no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m., eastern daylight time, on september 11th. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 1 -- 17 minutes of the initial report, africom directed an unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to repos
throughout in the world and not all, obviously are benghazi or tripoli or tunisia. the reality is that in most countries, in the world, we can rely on the host country to provide security. they're there. they're willing to do it. they do a good job. there are some of these embassies in some of these more volatile countries that are of concern. and those were the nineteen that we're designated by the state department as ones we had to look at more closely and develop a better approach to providing security. because there part of the problem is the host countries are not very good at providing that kind of security. >> is there a -- it seems this is so much of a distance in time challenge that when it happens, how quickly can we respond? how far away are we? is there a almost like a playbook for the ambassadors for the people in those facilities that here's the steps to follow. jump on them immediately if it dpunlt click we go this or that? >> the best playbook the general responded this as well. the best playbook is an ambassador who says, we have got serious security problems h
, to tunisia, from egypt to mali and others. while d.o.d. does not have primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i've said, we had received from the intelligence community almost 300 reports on possible threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities, including those in cairo, egypt, but there were no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m. eastern daylight time on september 11. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 17 minutes of the initial reports, about 3:59 p.m., africom directed an unmanned, unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to reposition overhead the benghazi facility. it was focused on the primar
concerning nuclear weapons, libya, mali, tunisia and egypt are in various states of unrest which we have no strategy. we are the most unsettled period since the end of the cold war. i have serious concerns as to the quality of senator hagel's professional judgment in the acuity of his views on critical areas of national security including security in the east asia and the middle east. his record on iraq is particularly troubling. as i alluded a moment ago in 2002 he voted to authorize the use of force against iraq. by 2006, the support for the war diminished after republican losses in the 2006 midterm elections. he wrote an opinion piece for "the washington post" under the title "leaving iraq honorable "foreforeshadowing. and president bush announced the decision to surge troops in 2007, senator hagel actively campaigned against it. he voted in february of 2007, in favor of a bill expressing opposition to the surge and in favor of measures to troops from iraq and equally bad policy. he wrote in the 2008 memoir, america our next chapter in historically show that the legislative efforts to
and for one-on-one talks concerning nuclear weapons. libya is obvious. a state ofgypt in unrest. now tunisia. we are probably in a more unsettled period since the end of the cold war and certainly i have ever seen. would you agree? >> i absolutely agree. >> meanwhile, the signal we are sending to the iranians is, don't worry. this aircraft carrier is not coming. this is really a disconnect the likes of which i have never seen before. i want to talk about the sequestration, because senator graham, senator a yacht -- ayotte travel around the country warning about the effects of sequestration. men and women of the military have said to us, how can we possibly do this, cause this uncertainty? the cancellation of the deployment of the aircraft carrier? the president of the united states said, it won't happen. during the campaign -- it won't happen. we were worried that it was going to happen. it is disgraceful to treat the men and women in the military so we all speak with such advocacy and passion on their behalf, to be subjected to this kind of day-to-day kind of uncertainty that they volunteer
or withdraw diplomatic staff in the advance of a crisis, from central america, from car whom, to tunisia, from egypt to mali and others. while d.o.d. does not have primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i've said, we had received from the intelligence community almost 300 reports on possible threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities, including those in cairo, egypt, but there were no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. my -- by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m. eastern daylight time on september 11. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 17 minutes of the initial reports, about 3:59 p.m., africom directed an unmanned, unmanned surveillance
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)